Mapi Publications

2018. Jendle J et al. – A utility valuation study assessing the impact of postprandial glucose control on quality of life of individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes

 

Jendle J, Sandberg A, Buchs S, Swinburn P, Hadi M, Levin LÅ. A utility valuation study assessing the impact of postprandial glucose control on quality of life of individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes 2018;2:20.

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Abstract

Background. Consideration of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in diabetes has been associated with long-term and short-term complications such as hypoglycaemia, but not with short-term glucose control. This study aimed to collect health utilities related to different degrees of poorly controlled postprandial glucose (PPG) and its impact on HRQOL in the UK and in Sweden.

Methods. Three health state descriptions were developed based on literature reviews and interviews with people with diabetes and healthcare professionals, characterising mild, moderate and severe impact of postprandial hyperglycaemic symptoms on HRQOL. Time Trade-Off (TTO) interviews with a 10-year trade-off period were conducted with samples of the UK general public and of Swedish people with diabetes. Mean TTO-derived health state values were expressed on a scale from 0 (death) to 1 (full health).

Results. One hundred fifty participants from the general population were interviewed in the UK (57% female, mean age 35 years) and 150 participants with diabetes in Sweden (64% female, mean age 51 years, 42% type 1 and 58% type 2 diabetes). The mean TTO-derived health state values were for the UK and Swedish participants: mild impact of poorly PPG control (0.89/0.76); moderate (0.75/0.71); severe (0.56/0.58).

Conclusions. Glucose lowering treatments associated with improved control over PPG levels could have important benefits to people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes since findings suggest that increasing severity in postprandial hyperglycaemic symptoms is perceived as having significant negative impact on HRQOL of individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.